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1) She looks over at her friends to see Nelly smiling at her.

2) She looks over at her friends and sees Nelly smiling at her.

3) She looks over at her friends to see that Nelly is smiling at her.

4) She looks over at her friends and sees that Nelly is smiling at her.


- Are all OK? Which one do you prefer?

- Are the sentences with "to see" just as good as the sentences with "and sees" if she had no idea that Nelly would be smiling at her before she looked?

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1) She looks over at her friends to see Nelly smiling at her. OK.

2) She looks over at her friends and sees Nelly smiling at her. OK

3) She looks over at her friends to see that Nelly is smiling at her. OK

4) She looks over at her friends and sees that Nelly is smiling at her. OK


- Are all OK? Yes

Which one do you prefer? In everyday conversation, perhaps #4.

- Are the sentences with "to see" just as good as the sentences with "and sees" if she had no idea that Nelly would be smiling at her before she looked? Yes. The 'to see' structure is a little more literary, a little fancier.

Clive